Build Objects With Interfaces

Being able to drop certain chunks of code from one piece of software to another piece of unrelated software is a powerful thing. Not only does this save time, but it will also allow you to build a small library of tools you find useful in all your applications. Interfaces in C# is just one of many ways to build more modular objects that have similar behavior.

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Disable You Have Created a Service

When you create a basic WCF service hosted through IIS, you are greeted with a generic page informing you that “You Have Created a Service”. This is useful since it provides to the developer two critical pieces of information. First it lets you know that the service is up and running, second it provides basic code stubs to query the service with. While this may be fine for development, you might not want to display this page in production. Disabling it is not intuitive, but with some searching through the MSDN documentation I have found the preferred way of changing this page.

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Debugging With Conditionals

So you have your program written out, and you have met all your goals. You are so confident that the program is ready, you rip out the debug statements and other debugging related functionality from it. You fire up the program and feed it the initial values and BAM nothing works! If only you kept the debug calls! Well you can avoid this in the future by using conditions in your code.

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C# Classes Versus Structures

There are a few situations where a C# structure will provided better performance than a C# class and other times a class will be faster than a structure. The reason for this is how C# is handling both of these in memory during program execution.

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